Basil Essential Oil


Basil (Sweet) – (Ocimum basilicum ct linalool)

By FASTILY (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL, via Wikimedia Commons
Basil comes from the plants flowers and leaves. It is usually steam distilled. Basil has a sweet and spicy or herbaceous smell which I find very energizing and warming. Many of you are familiar with its smell since you use the herb’s leaves often as a spice when cooking.

Basil’s chemical composition can vary. The linalol type is the safest type of Basil Essential Oil. It is the linalol type I will be referring to in this article. Make sure if you are going to purchase Basil Essential Oil that you check the chemical composition since other types of Basil contain high amounts of estragole (methyl chavicol) and are not considered to be as safe.

Basil ct. linalol is best known for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, and expectorant properties.

Traditional Uses of Basil

Basil (Sweet) is best known for its uplifting and energizing smell. It’s smell helps bring relief for mental fatigue leaving you with a feeling of confidence and alertness. Basil supports the nervous system and helps with fatigue. It has also been used to settle digestive discomfort such as gas and bloating. Basil works well for headaches, nerve pain, and other various muscle aches and pains. Many have used Basil for chest colds, sinus congestion, and spastic coughs.

Using Basil

Basil is great to use with your diffuser or via direct inhalation. You can also use it in a balm or salve and use it with a massage.

Diffuser Blends with Basil Essential Oil

To support yourself during times of stress and tension or to open up your respiratory system, diffuse a blend of Basil and Lavender.

To support yourself during times of fatigue, diffuse a blend of Basil and Lemon.

Sweet Basil Essential Oil is in the following products: Headache Roll On, Energy Roll On and Focus Aroma Inhaler.

You can purchase Basil Essential Oil by visiting Aromatics International.

Remember to follow suggested safety practices when using essential oils.

References:

Battaglia, Salvatore. The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy. Brisbane: International Centre of Holistic Aromatherapy, 2003. Print.
“Essential Oils, Body Butters, Carriers, Hydrosols.” Aromatherapy Pure, Organic Essential Oils | Aromatics International. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Nov 2016. <https://www.aromatics.com/>.
Lawless, Julia. The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: A Complete Guide to the Use of Aromatics in Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health & Well-being. Shaftesbury, Dorset: Element, 1992. Print.
Pressimone, Jennifer.  JennScents: Holistic Aromatherapy Comprehnesive Guide, Clermont: Jennscents, Inc.: 2015. Print